We’re starting something new around here so that our readers and supporters can meet some of the people and children that we work with on a daily basis. We hope that through our website you’ll be able to connect or reconnect with some of the girls, boys, babies, and staff. Enjoy!


 

Willienne Deralin

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If you’ve ever visited the Consolation Center, you’ve no doubt met Willienne. Her bubbly, outgoing nature makes her one of the more outgoing girls. If she’s happy, you’ll know it. If she’s angry, you’ll know it. Needless to say, she’s very transparent with her emotions. She recently turned 17 and would be considered one of the older girls at the Center. Willienne is known for her superior athletic ability and her love for singing worship.

Many of the girls we work with have been through horrific situations, which can either cause them to withdraw emotionally or be more transparent. As mentioned above, Willienne is the latter. Also, like several of the children we work with, Willienne lost her mother at a very young age. Following her mothers death, she was sent to live with her father in a very destitute and rough part of Port-au-Prince. At the time of the 2010 earthquake, Willienne was separated from her father. She was eleven years old. The earthquake made many orphans that year and forced many children onto the streets for sheer survival but also made them prey to many dark and impressionable experiences. Many children, including Willienne, fell into a restavek situation (a domestic slave) .  Restavek’s are children who are promised care and education, but in turn are often mistreated and forced into completing menial domestic tasks for no pay. Eventually, she was kicked out of the home because the man of household did not like her. Again, she was back on the streets. Several months later, a friend of Eddy ‘s (the director of the CCH) found Willienne and brought her to the Center.

Willienne has a relationship with the Lord and we pray that she continues to grow in her love and delight in Him.

*Photo Credit Audrey Sultenfuss

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